What temperature should i solder guitar pickups?

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Giovanny Grant asked a question: What temperature should i solder guitar pickups?
Asked By: Giovanny Grant
Date created: Wed, Mar 3, 2021 8:20 PM
Date updated: Sun, Sep 25, 2022 5:54 AM

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Top best answers to the question «What temperature should i solder guitar pickups»

Somewhere between 300C (572F) and 350C (662F) is about right. The solder should melt as soon as it touches the iron, but if it splatters when it does it's too hot.

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Knowing what temperature to set and how long to preheat the area comes with experience. Leaded solder melts at around 190°C and lead free at around 200°C. With printed circuit boards, an iron temperature of about 325°C should be a safe starting point, because it’s imperative not to damage the board.

It depends what you are doing. A good quality 18-25W iron will be fine for soldering pickup wires. To solder the earth connections onto the pots, 50W would be preferable. For soldering / desoldering the pickup covers 80W - to get the heat in quickly. Soldering guns are out due to the strong magnetic field they create.

What solder should I use for guitar? Do use rosin-core solder! Standard 60/40 rosin-core is best, and we prefer smaller . 032″-. 062″ diameters for guitar wiring. Do “tin” the wire and the soldering points before soldering the joint. What temperature should I solder my guitar at? Leaded solder melts at around 190°C and lead free at ...

It's best to use true eutectic solder which melts at a slightly lower temp than typical 60/40 and is less prone to 'cold solder' joints. Lead free is worse, with a still higher temp flow point. If you have a temperature controlled iron you should be good either way.

If there’s a guitar you’re doing a lot of work on, or you’re going to be soldering in a lot of the same type of guitar, you could make a “soldering shield” for that guitar. This is a piece of thick card big enough to cover a decent area of the guitar, with a hole cut in it the same shape as the wiring cavity.

The soldering temperature is also something you will figure out as you go try. If you are having trouble getting the solder to melt, it means you should turn up the heat a bit. If you are burning your components, it might be time to consider turning the temperature down.

For guitar and amp work, i'd recommend a soldering station with temperature control. We talk with five pickup builders specializing in single coils: An introduction to soldering for guitarists. The highlighted blobs of solder on the back of the volume pot, pickup selector, and tone pot.

Just expose enough wire for soldering, usually 1/16" to 1/8". Too much exposed wire can contact ground wires, shielded pickup wires, or "hot" wires. Do use rosin-core solder! Standard 60/40 rosin-core is best, and we prefer smaller .032"-.062" diameters for guitar wiring. Do "tin" the wire and the soldering points before soldering the joint ...

yes, it's fairly easy. yes, you could probably get away with replacing the leads from the old p'up with those of the new one, but i suppose it depends on how the old one is wired up. don't spend a ton on a soldering iron, but buy a decent one. make sure it's at least 30-45 watts. less can do the job, but you'll be cursing yourself at the time it can take to heat the joint.

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